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    19.09.2022

    Cecilia Müller Torbrand, Chief Executive Officer , Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN)

    Tackling Corruption in the Maritime Industry

    Corruption is no longer solely a local or siloed problem for companies as fines alongside hefty enforcement mechanisms now reach head offices as well as senior management. Anti-corruption enforcement has developed into an area of foreign policy with far-reaching consequences for companies and senior executives. The maritime industry in particular is exposed to corruption risk. Every day, vessels and cargos enter ports where operational processes involve numerous stakeholders across several jurisdictions, resulting in multiple interactions with government officials. This provides fertile ground for corruption where multiple government officials enjoy broad discretionary powers. Hence, corruption poses a severe threat to issues pertaining safety, security and investor relations.

      25.08.2022

      Susanne Justesen, Project Director, Human Sustainability, Global Maritime Forum

      Siyuan Qin, Project Assistant, Global Maritime Forum

      Young maritime leaders determined to see the industry improve its approach to human sustainability

      In April 2022, Global Maritime Forum called for young professionals across the global maritime industry to participate in this year’s Future Maritime Leaders essay competition. We asked them how the maritime industry may significantly improve its approach to human sustainability and what issues and challenges need to be addressed before 2030.

      25.08.2022

      Apurva Chaubal, Future Maritime Leaders Essay Competition winner,

      Mental Health & Inclusion: Prioritizing the Need for Awareness & Training

      Apurva Chaubal, the winner of the Future Maritime Leaders essay competition, addresses seafarers’ concerns on long work hours, low pay, loneliness, and mental health.  In her essay she discusses how seafaring can be restored as one of the most prestigious careers worldwide.

      25.08.2022

      James Helliwell, Future Maritime Leaders Essay Competition winner,

      Future fuels must be safe to seafarers!

      James Helliwell, the winner of the Future Maritime Leaders essay competition, underlines the need to put human sustainability and seafarer safety at the forefront before introducing new zero emission fuels which bring new safety risks.

      25.08.2022

      Shaharaj Ahmed, Future Maritime Leaders Essay Competition winner,

      Cultivating Humane Labour Practices in the Maritime Industry

      Shaharaj Ahmed, the winner of the Future Maritime Leaders essay competition, argues that enforcing humane labour practices is the maritime industry’s most critical human sustainability issue. In his essay he focuses on seafarers’ long working hours and low payment issues.

      25.08.2022

      Green Corridors: Definitions and Approaches

      This discussion paper considers emerging approaches to defining, initiating, and governing Maritime Green Corridors, and puts forward recommendations in each area. These recommendations attempt to reinforce the most effective and impactful approaches while acknowledging the need for flexibility.

      09.05.2022

      Aparajit Pandey, Shipping Lead, Energy Transitions Commission

      Kasper Søgaard, Managing Director, Head of Institutional Strategy and Development, Global Maritime Forum

      Dr Lau Blaxekjær, Senior Project Manager, Global Maritime Forum

      Femke Spiegelenberg, Project Assistant, Global Maritime Forum

      Robert Montgomery, Project Advisor, Global Maritime Forum

      How EU Contracts for Difference can support zero-emission fuels

      The European Union (EU) is introducing new regulation to reduce GHG intensity and emissions from the shipping industry under the ‘Fit for 55’ package to achieve the decarbonization goals set out in the European Green Deal.

      09.05.2022

      Stamatis Bourboulis, General Manager, Euronav Ship Management

      Randall Krantz, Senior Project Advisor on Shipping Decarbonization, Global Maritime Forum/Getting to Zero Coalition

      Lara Mouftier, Interim Lead Shipping Emissions and Ocean Agenda, World Economic Forum/Getting to Zero Coalition

      Alternative fuels: Retrofitting ship engines

      02.05.2022

      Carlo Raucci, Decarbonisation Consultant, Lloyd's Register/Maritime Decarbonisation Hub

      Randall Krantz, Senior Project Advisor on Shipping Decarbonization, Global Maritime Forum/Getting to Zero Coalition

      Lara Mouftier, Interim Lead Shipping Emissions and Ocean Agenda, World Economic Forum/Getting to Zero Coalition

      Engines and onboard systems

      The Getting to Zero Coalition is committed to accelerating shipping decarbonization by getting commercially viable deep sea zero emission vessels powered by zero emission fuels into operation by 2030 to put shipping on a path for full decarbonization by 2050. To unpack the different fuels and technologies options that could support the transition to zero emission fuels, the workstream on Fuels & Technologies has hosted a series of webinars, gathering perspectives from experts across the maritime value chain – shipowners, operators, charterers, financial institutions, classification societies, and NGOs. The insight briefing paper series aims to reach a broader audience and build a common understanding of the fuels, engines, and storage technologies that will enable the decarbonization transition.

      25.04.2022

      Emma Foley, Head of Development, Human Rights at Sea (HRAS)

      War in Ukraine: Seafarers suffering human rights violations need our continued support

      The Russian invasion of Ukraine has sent shockwaves around the world. As the two countries plunge deeper into war the impact of the conflict on the global seaborne trade and supply chain has been reacted too swiftly by the international maritime sector. However, for the seafarers facing human rights violations and ever-worsening conditions, there is both a need and opportunity to do more, quickly.

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