ANNUAL SUMMIT

Taking the lead

The Global Maritime Forum’s 2019 Annual Summit took place in Singapore on 30-31 October. The meeting convened the leaders from across the maritime spectrum who have the will to address the burning issues facing the maritime industry.

Decarbonizing shipping

At the UN Climate Action Summit in New York in September, the Global Maritime Forum announced the Getting to Zero Coalition with the shared ambition of having commercially viable zero emission vessels operating along deep-sea trade routes by 2030, a vision that was first articulated at the Global Maritime Forum’s Annual Summit in 2018. Earlier this year, the Poseidon Principles – the world’s first sector-specific, self-governing climate alignment agreement amongst financial institutions – were formally launched in June.

This year’s Annual Summit will be an opportunity to discuss the progress made and to define the concrete next steps to put the maritime industry on the path towards a zero emission future. Key questions for discussion include:

  • What are the fuels, technologies, and supply chains needed to transition to a low-carbon future?
  • How can the development and deployment of low-carbon solutions be financed and de-risked, especially to motivate first movers?
  • How can policies be accelerated at a local, national and regional level to enable a rapid shift away from the use of fossil fuels?

The discussions will be informed by expert presentations on the following topics:

  1. How to implement a carbon levy for shipping by Ian Parry, Principal Environmental Fiscal Policy Expert at the International Monetary Fund (IMF)
  2. Zero emission fuels for shipping by John Kornerup Bang, Head of Sustainability Strategy and Chief Advisor on Climate Change at A.P. Møller-Mærsk and Nick Brown, Director, Marine & Offshore at Lloyd’s Register
  3. Viable pathways for shipping’s decarbonization by Roland Roesch, Deputy Director, Innovation and Technology Center at the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
  4. Environmental law activism and what it means for the maritime industry by Stephanie Morton, Climate Finance Lawyer, Client Earth

In preparing for the discussions, you may find the following materials helpful:

Together in Safety

Every year around the world, hundreds of seafarers are killed or seriously injured. The safety record of other industries shows that improvements in safety performance are possible, but that it will take leadership, collective responsibility and collaboration across the industry to get there. At last year’s Annual Summit, industry leaders united around the vision of a zero-incident industry and created the “Together in Safety” programme. Since then, shipping industry groups and key leaders have been working together to make improvements.

At this year’s Summit, the first results of “Together in Safety” will be presented – focusing on best practices and industry leadership – and the next steps towards achieving the vision of a zero-incident industry will be defined. Key questions include:

  • How can we work together to quickly implement the “Together in Safety” actions?
  • What are the common best safety practices that will make a step change in safety performance across the maritime industry?
  • What is the effect of mental health and well-being on safety and how can we address this issue?

The discussions will be informed by expert presentations on the following topics:

  1. How the maritime industry can use digital platforms to improve safety at sea by Manit Chander, Chief Executive Officer of HiLo Maritime Risk Management
  2. Why wellbeing and mental health is one of the most important safety factors by Sarah Waite, Strategy and Performance Excellence Manager at Shell

To prepare for the discussions, you may find the following materials useful:

Attracting the right talent

To succeed, the maritime industry must attract the right people, with the right skills and in the right numbers. But demographical changes, increased competition for talent, and new demands from young people towards potential employers raise important challenges. At the same time, the skills required in the future may be radically different from those demanded today, for instance due to the diffusion of digital technologies and the introduction of new zero emission fuels.

Discussions at the Global Maritime Forum’s Annual Summit will be an opportunity to explore these issues and identify ways in which the maritime industry can work together to attract the right talent for the future. Key questions include:

  • What skills are needed to fully embrace the opportunities of the digital transformation?
  • How can we achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal #5 and empower women in the maritime community?
  • How can the maritime industry compete with other industries for the best and the brightest?

The discussions will be informed by expert presentations on the following topics:

  1. What the global maritime industry can learn from public-private collaboration on talent by Annie Koh, Vice President, Business Development and Academic Director, Business Families Institute and International Trading Institute at Singapore Management University and Kenneth Lim, Senior Director, Chief Technology Officer at the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore
  2. How the maritime sector can support sustainable and inclusive growth by Isabelle Durant, Deputy Secretary-General at United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)

In preparing for the discussions, you may find the following materials helpful:

Improving efficiency through collaboration

To survive in the maritime industry, companies must continually improve their efficiency of operations. But highly efficient maritime companies are not enough to optimize efficiency of the maritime logistics chain, since many issues cannot be dealt with by any company acting on its own. The multitude and magnitude of reporting requirements, the lack of common standards, and the inefficiencies of port call operations are all examples of issues with room for improvement.

This year’s Annual Summit of Global Maritime Forum will focus on developing pre-competitive ways of collaborating to improve the efficiency of the maritime logistics chain, reduce waste and resource use, and stimulate global trade to the benefit of the maritime industry and the world it serves. Key questions for discussion include:

  • How can data sharing and digital technologies be leveraged to improve the efficiency of the maritime logistics chain?
  • How can the maritime industry work together with governments and other stakeholders to reduce the administrative burdens on international trade?
  • Can standardization drive radical improvements in efficiency in the same way as the container has done?

The discussions will be informed by expert presentations on the following topics:

  1. The Fourth Industrial Revolution: How new technologies are impacting society and businesses by Nicholas Davis, Co-Author of Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution and Professor of Practice at Thunderbird School of Management
  2. Unlocking value through digital and collaboration by Sanjaya Mohottala, Managing Director and Partner at BCG
  3. How digital and physical technologies can be merged and implemented through broad collaboration by Deanna MacDonald, Chief Executive Officer at BLOC
  4. How the maritime industry can boost trade and support the Sustainable Development Goals by Philippe Isler, Director at the Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation

In preparing for the discussions, you may find the following materials helpful: